The MongoDB Engineering Journal

A tech blog for builders, by builders

All Posts tagged in "Ci"
  • Testing Linearizability with Jepsen and Evergreen: “Call Me Continuously!”

    Intro

    What do you do with a third-party tool that proves your application lacks a feature? Add that tool to your continuous integration system (after adding the feature, of course)! In our case we have added linearizable reads to MongoDB 3.4 and use Jepsen to test it.

    Evergeeen logo plus Jepsen

    What is Linearizability?

    Linearizability is a property of distributed systems first introduced by Herlihy & Wing in their July 1990 article “Linearizability: a correctness condition for concurrent objects” (ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems Journal). Peter Bailis probably provides the most accessible explanation of linearizability: “writes should appear to be instantaneous. Imprecisely, once a write completes, all later reads (where “later” is defined by wall-clock start time) should return the value of that write or the value of a later write. Once a read returns a particular value, all later reads should return that value or the value of a later write.”

    In MongoDB 3.4, linearizable reads are now supported on single documents, using a new read concern called “linearizable”. Previously, linearizable reads were possible only by using a findAndModify operation on a single document and updating an extraneous field in the document, with a writeConcern of “majority”. Keep in mind there is a performance penalty for this. Linearizable reads have a performance profile similar to majority writes, as each linearizable read makes use of a no-op majority write to the replica set to ensure the data being read is durable and not stale.

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  • Evergreen Continuous Integration: Why We Reinvented The Wheel

    We’ve all been there: you’re pitching a solution when one of your team members interjects, “let’s not reinvent the wheel, here.” Whether it’s based on fear or wisdom, the charge of reinventing the wheel is a death sentence for ideas. It typically isn’t worth the time and resources to implement a new version of an old, ubiquitous idea—though you’d never know that with all the different kinds of actual, literal wheels you use every day.

    All different kinds of wheels

    For most developers, continuous integration (CI)—the automated building and testing of new code pushed into your repository—is one of those never-reinvented wheels. You set up one of a few long-standing solutions like Travis or Jenkins, rejigger your test code to fit into that solution’s organizational model, and then avoid messing with it too much. Here at MongoDB, challenging this approach rewarded us incredibly.

    Instead of working around an off-the-shelf solution that didn’t fit our needs, we wound up reinventing the wheel and built our own continuous integration system called Evergreen. It gives us a powerful, efficient infrastructure that lets us test changes quickly – and keeps our engineers happy as well. Our journey to creating Evergreen was born of necessity and stalked by uncertainty, but we don’t regret it. Reinventing the wheel allowed us to build a near-perfect CI tool for our use case, seriously evaluate powerful new technologies, and have a lot of fun doing it.

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