Filtered by Tag: workflow

Succeeding With ClangFormat, Part 3: Persisting The Change

| | c++ clang workflow style git

 

If you’ve been following our series on succeeding with ClangFormat, you already know all about why we did it and the steps we took to ensure the migration went well. In this concluding post, we’ll talk about how to succeed after the integration and reformat are complete. We learned some valuable lessons about what happens in the immediate aftermath of bringing ClangFormat into our system and have been refining our workflows ever since. Here’s a look at our occasionally bumpy road and how you might have a smoother one.

Succeeding With ClangFormat, Part 2: The Big Reformat

| | c++ clang workflow style

When properly integrated into a toolchain, ClangFormat can entirely do away with time wasted on discussion and enforcement of code formatting. In part 1 of this series, I laid out the case for doing so, the factors that doomed our prior attempt, and the approach we took to get it right the next time. In this part I’ll walk through all the details that have to be considered before drawing up a functional specification and reaching the next milestone: codebase conversion.

Setting the format

Landing on a format was surprisingly easy, considering how contentious formatting choices can be. In this area, MongoDB has the benefit of being towards the larger end of team size. In a large shop, developers seem more understanding that "there is a way of doing things" that might not be their personal preference. But regardless of your team's size, everyone has to agree on the fundamental principle that a standard is more important that which standard. Start your initiative with obtaining buy-in, and demonstrate your commitment to solving disputes fairly, and you will find this step is not as fraught as you might expect.

Succeeding With ClangFormat, Part 1: Pitfalls And Planning

| | c++ clang workflow style

Last year, MongoDB began using ClangFormat to apply a globally consistent format to our C++ codebase, and has maintained that uniformity ever since. The most important factor in our success wasn’t deciding on the particular format or handling git issues. It was making sure it was effortless for developers to produce properly formatted code, and integrating automated checks at every phase of our dev process.

I was the developer in charge of designing our ClangFormat implementation and integrating it into our process, as well as “chief cat herder” to achieve consensus on code format. Planning and rolling out the use of a formatting tool is not too hard; but it requires forethought, coordination, and a commitment to enabling and enforcing its use. It can be time consuming, but the end result is that everyone has only one format to grok. After, every moment of time wasted on code formatting or discussion thereof is eliminated. Maybe you know entirely different types of developers than I do, but in my experience, that's a lot of time saved.

The difficulty of maintaining consistent formatting

MongoDB is a large open source code base with over a half-million lines of code, scores of full-time developers, and many community contributors. But even with smaller projects, most developers discover the problems of working without an agreed upon format the very first time they work on a team. This irritation can lead to religious arguments over the merits of various formatting choices; but mature engineers know that a standard is more important than which standard.